Self-Guided Walking Tours

Self-Guided Walking Holidays

At Footfalls Walking Holidays, we offer a variety of self-guided walking holiday packages to cater for all walkers including ramblers, nature lovers, hikers and fitness enthusiasts.

All our self-guided/independent walking holidays and vacations are carefully hand-picked with your wellbeing in mind and to make sure that we have them arranged so that you get the maximum enjoyment from your vacation with us.

All routes are walked and checked regularly by Christopher Stacey of Footfalls Walking Holidays and you will walk with his route note descriptions on each tour. Accommodations are frequently checked by Christopher & Teresa Stacey of Footfalls to make sure that they are of the highest standard for our guests.

Whether you are looking for that well-earned short break walking tour, or a long vacation we have the tour for you and if you can’t find it in the itinerary please contact us and we will arrange it for you.

What makes a Footfalls Self-Guided Vacation Different?

Almost three decades of experience in setting up and organising independent/self-guided walking tours.

We are a family run business which means we will take person care to make sure we have your tour organised exactly how you want it.

We are always on hand to answer any query that you may have, so please do get in touch. And give us the pleasure of setting up your walking vacation.

What do we do?

Ireland

Ireland North

Antrim & Donegal

Sea cliffs, coastal paths, spectacular glens and valleys to wide open rolling countryside, all combine to make walking in the north and north-west of Ireland a walker’s wonderland.

Our walking tours take you from the Green Glens of Antrim to the enchanted Rathlin Island, just off the north east coast, the only inhabited offshore island in Northern Ireland, to the Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge that links the mainland to the tiny island of Carrick-a-Rede, taking in the breath-taking scenery of the Causeway Coast and the Giant’s Causeway.

The Bluestack Way in Donegal takes you through some of the most remote areas of the north-west of Ireland. The trail connects the town of Donegal with the village of Kilcar in the west of the county, taking in some of the most outstanding scenery along the wild Atlantic coastline and visiting quaint villages like Glenties, Ardara and Glencolmcille. You will discover spectacular views at every turn of the trail in the magisterial Bluestack Mountains of Donegal.

Ireland West

Aran Western Way, Burren, Connemara

Our self-guided walking of the west of Ireland take you into in this unique land, rich in poetic roots and haunting history. The walking trail also offers some of the finest scenery that Ireland has to offer along the Wild Atlantic Way.
The Aran Islands has the distinction of being granted One of The World’s Top Island Destination’s by National Geographic. Described by them as, “Unspoilt, beautiful, and dramatic destination for archaeology, bird-watching, and spectacular hill walking.”

Connemara in County Galway on the Western Way self-guided walks you will find rolling countryside, quiet forests and remote mountain valleys, lakes and meandering rivers and streams.  You will have the option to take a day of rest and visit the famous Kylemore Abbey a Benedictine monastery founded in 1920 on the grounds of Kylemore Castle.

The Burren in County Clare situated in the southwest of Ireland, famous for its unique limestone landscape of fossils, rock formations and archaeological sites and rich flora. Among the many varied and beautiful flowers which have come to symbolise the Burren are spring gentian, shrubby cinquefoil and bloody cranesbill and, mountain avens, on the higher terraces, you will find the hoary rock rose.  The Burren is also home to the towering Cliffs of Moher and the nearby village of Doolin, renowned centre of traditional Irish Music.

Ireland South-West

Ireland South

Beara, Sheepshead

A walker’s paradise is the simplest way to describe both the Sheepshead and the Beara Peninsulas.

Our Beara Way self-guided walking tour is an stunning long distance walking trail in the south west of Cork and Kerry, approximately 184 km (114 miles). Our full route begins and ends in the town of Glengarriff and takes many villages and town as you walk around the peninsula like Ireland’s second largest fishing town, Castletownbere, the pictures village of Allihies and Eyeries and the town of Kenmare. Take a short 15-minute ferry ride and visit Beara Island, or the cable car to the enchanted Dursey Island From the time you arrive onto the Beara Peninsula until you leave you will not be disappointed with the views, the magnificent flora and fauna and wonderful welcoming people.  

Our self-guided tour of the Sheep’s Head begins in the town of Bantry, a heritage and market town and guides you out onto one of the most remote peninsulas on the south west coast of Ireland. You will have stunning views on the north side of the peninsula across Bantry Bay to the Beara Peninsula. On the south side gives you views over Dunmanus Bay and out to Mizen Head Peninsula in the distance. Along the way you will have the privilege of visiting three villages, Kilcrohane, Ahakista and Durrus. The Sheepshead Peninsula is a place of heavenly peace, unspoilt beauty and tranquil scenery.

Ireland East

Wicklow Way

Experience Ireland’s Ancient East where vibrant history and modern life meet.

Our self-guided walking tours cover the Mourne Mountains in Northern Ireland and the Wicklow Mountains south of Dublin.

Our 8-day self-guided walking tour takes you along the foothills of the Mourne Mountains from the market town of Castlewellan to the shores of Dundrum Bay and through the seaside town of Newcastle.

The Mourne Mountains are a gentle and graceful granite domed and heather-covered mountain range, containing 12 peaks grouped together and covering an area of approximately 12 km / 7.5 miles. You will be simply amazed at the variety of different landscapes that you will encountered within such a confined area.
Voted the ‘Best Walking Destination’ in Northern Ireland in WalkNI’s (Walk Northern Ireland) inaugural awards.

Our self-guided walking tour of the Wicklow Mountains takes you along one of Ireland’s oldest way-marked walking and hiking trail. J.B Malone pioneered this popular, 127 km (79 miles), walking route over 40 years ago and it reveals some of Ireland’s finest views including Powerscourt Waterfall, Luggala Estate, Loch Dan, Glenmalure and historic Glendalough. Wicklow is better known as the Garden of Ireland which makes it one of the most photogenic counties in the country. On the Wicklow Way you will encounter a landscape that offers an amazing collection of diverse visual experiences from meanderings rivers and streams, heather clad mountains, Lakes, lush green valleys and much more…….

United Kingdom

United Kingdom – Wales, West Highland Way

For our self-guided walking tours of Great Britain, we cover three areas at the moment, Scotland and two regions in Wales, North Wales and the Pembrokeshire Coastal Path in the south-west of Wales.

Our self-guided walking tour of Scotland takes you onto the West Highland Way, a stunning trail that covers approximately 154 km (96 miles) from Milngavie, north of Glasgow, to Fort William in the Scottish Highlands. For the most part, the trail follows old drovers’ roads that guide you through the rolling hills and lush farmland of the Lowlands and the deep glens and mountains of the Highlands. A self-guided tour not to be missed, please book early as this tour fills up fast.

Wales offers everything from the high mountain peak of Snowdon to the lush green valleys of Conway and Bets-y-Coed to the stunning coastal path in Pembrokeshire, something to suit all levels of fitness and abilities.  One of our self-guided walking tour of wales takes you into the Snowdonia National Park, covering an area of approximately (2,130 km2)  823 square miles of diverse landscapes.

Snowdonia steeped in culture and local history, where more than half its population speak there native language, Welsh.

The Pembrokeshire Coastal Path was officially opened in 1970 and had the honour of being the first National Way Marked Trail in Wales. The trail follows the coastline from Amroth in the south to St Dogmales in the north covering a distance of just under 300 km or 186 miles.

You will experience sandy bays, limestone cliffs, coastal flowers and fauna as well as evidence of human activity from Neolithic times to the present and some of the most breathtaking coastal scenery in Wales.

The Camino

The Camino

The ancient routes of Camino de Santiago or ‘Way of St James’, was traditionally a religious pilgrimage and is still so today for many people. Others choose it as a walking holiday or for other reasons like a personal challenge, fitness and of course spiritual reasons. The Camino Way takes you into some stunning country trails, through quaint villages where you will have the opportunity to chat and mingle with the locals and sample some of the local cuisines and stay in some of the local guesthouses.  

Whatever your reason may be for walking the Camino, this is one walking tour that will not disappoint you. And you will return home refreshed and vitalised and ready to take on everyday life again.